Jason Wilde

Photographs / Silly Arse Broke It

Silly Arse Broke It


The last thirty years has seen globalisation, mass immigration and economic upheaval transform societies across the planet on a scale and speed that is unique in modern history. Built in the 1950s, the Clarence Way council estate has been one of many tiny focal points of this rapidly shifting social landscape. Located a few minutes’ walk north from Camden Town underground station in London, the six orange brick-blocks that make up the estate, house 1297 people (2011 census) in 354 units.

I have lived here since 1997, and in that time I have witnessed the estate become home to people from within Britain and abroad who have been affected by a variety of diverse global events and circumstances. In an attempt to build a multi-layered project around this constantly changing community, in 2003, I started collecting and photographing handwritten notes that I found discarded on the estate.

On one level, these salvaged texts are simple records of the everyday; they function to remind, instruct, organise and explain. They tell of journeys planned and taken, and list items to purchase and food to take away. Some make grand political and philosophical statements while others are simply mysterious.

Using a digital workflow the photographs of these once-private texts were layered over photographs of the orange bricks used to build the housing blocks, creating unique still-life montages that invite the viewer to contemplate a small inner-city community that is a microcosm for the social flux and cultural (dis)integration that characterises 21st century Britain.

Silly Arse Broke It BIo

  • 2015 - Photomonitor
  • 2015 - Athens Photo Festival, Shortlisted
  • 2104 - Guernsey Photography Festival
  • 2014 - Creative Review Blog
  • 2014 - Doc Photo Magazine
  • 2014 - aCurator / June 

Silly Arse Broke It


The last thirty years has seen globalisation, mass immigration and economic upheaval transform societies across the planet on a scale and speed that is unique in modern history. Built in the 1950s, the Clarence Way council estate has been one of many tiny focal points of this rapidly shifting social landscape. Located a few minutes’ walk north from Camden Town underground station in London, the six orange brick-blocks that make up the estate, house 1297 people (2011 census) in 354 units.

I have lived here since 1997, and in that time I have witnessed the estate become home to people from within Britain and abroad who have been affected by a variety of diverse global events and circumstances. In an attempt to build a multi-layered project around this constantly changing community, in 2003, I started collecting and photographing handwritten notes that I found discarded on the estate.

On one level, these salvaged texts are simple records of the everyday; they function to remind, instruct, organise and explain. They tell of journeys planned and taken, and list items to purchase and food to take away. Some make grand political and philosophical statements while others are simply mysterious.

Using a digital workflow the photographs of these once-private texts were layered over photographs of the orange bricks used to build the housing blocks, creating unique still-life montages that invite the viewer to contemplate a small inner-city community that is a microcosm for the social flux and cultural (dis)integration that characterises 21st century Britain.

Silly Arse Broke It BIo

  • 2015 - Photomonitor
  • 2015 - Athens Photo Festival, Shortlisted
  • 2104 - Guernsey Photography Festival
  • 2014 - Creative Review Blog
  • 2014 - Doc Photo Magazine
  • 2014 - aCurator / June 

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