Jason Wilde

Photographs / Knocking Dollies Out Of Bed

Knocking Dollies Out Of Bed


My former primary school, St Mary & St Pancras, was attended by my nan, my mum and my sisters. The school was recently rebuilt on the same site as the old school in a ward called Somers Town in the London Borough of Camden. I was a pupil there in the early 1970s when the ward was made up of 19 council estates, 13 pubs, 4 primary schools, two secondary schools, a few small shops and cafes and not much else.

The population was almost all white and working class and apart from baptisms, weddings and funerals, it was a predominantly secular neighbourhood. I grew up in this very strong and historically bonded community with traditional social structures and a set of relatively straightforward and shared narratives.

These social structures and rites of passage have been eroded by the rapid social and technological changes of the last three decades and it could be argued that without them young people are struggling to occupy a meaningful place within society. We build our identities on the stories that we tell and on the stories that we are told.

By carefully arranging two different sets of images, Knocking Dollies Out Of Bed sets out to provide the time and space for the viewer to reflect on the mixed expectations of culture and on a confusing set of narratives that society compels our children to take part in.

Knocking Dollies Out Of Bed Bio

  • 2015, Encontros Da Imagem International Photography Festival, Portugal
  • 2010, KTHC, London. Interim Show
  • 2010, Arts Council England funding

Knocking Dollies Out Of Bed


My former primary school, St Mary & St Pancras, was attended by my nan, my mum and my sisters. The school was recently rebuilt on the same site as the old school in a ward called Somers Town in the London Borough of Camden. I was a pupil there in the early 1970s when the ward was made up of 19 council estates, 13 pubs, 4 primary schools, two secondary schools, a few small shops and cafes and not much else.

The population was almost all white and working class and apart from baptisms, weddings and funerals, it was a predominantly secular neighbourhood. I grew up in this very strong and historically bonded community with traditional social structures and a set of relatively straightforward and shared narratives.

These social structures and rites of passage have been eroded by the rapid social and technological changes of the last three decades and it could be argued that without them young people are struggling to occupy a meaningful place within society. We build our identities on the stories that we tell and on the stories that we are told.

By carefully arranging two different sets of images, Knocking Dollies Out Of Bed sets out to provide the time and space for the viewer to reflect on the mixed expectations of culture and on a confusing set of narratives that society compels our children to take part in.

Knocking Dollies Out Of Bed Bio

  • 2015, Encontros Da Imagem International Photography Festival, Portugal
  • 2010, KTHC, London. Interim Show
  • 2010, Arts Council England funding


Using Format